September 2, 2014

Best Golf Lessons: Understanding The Impact Of Club Face Path

best golf lessonsOne of the best golf lessons is to understand the impact and significance of club face path.

The reason why understanding the impact of club face path is one of the best golf lessons is that if you assume a given path produces a specific ball flight when it actually produces the opposite, you could mishit a ton of golf shots instead of hitting your golf ball straight to your target.

For example, I read a recent article where the golf swing instructions to fix a slice was to take the club more to the inside of the shoulder (body)  line during the back swing.

What the author did not know is that a slice ball flight typically is produced by taking the club to the inside of the body line during the back swing, especially if the path of the club face was parallel with the shoulders at the completion of the set up proceedings.

If you are attempting to fix a slice by taking the club even more to the inside of the shoulder line, you may correct a slice but are likely to produce a pull or worse, a pull-hook.

Since there is so much confusion as a result of erroneous golf swing tips about club face path, perhaps it is time to have a refresher on what really happens during a simple golf swing.

Assume you have established a square alignment and an online swing path of your club face at the completion of your set up routine.  Assume also that you have a comfortable posture and stance to your ball, have centered the sweet spot of your club face as near as possible to the back of your ball and have aligned your shoulders parallel with y0ur target line.

If you were then to take your club face to the inside of your shoulder line during your back swing and allow your club face to return to the ball reflexively without any manipulation to route it off of its swing path during your downswing, you most likely will slice your ball. Your club face will contact your ball with an open alignment and on an out-to-in path across your shoulder and target lines.

In such a set up, if you were to swing your club face even more to the inside of your shoulder line during your back swing, you most likely would pull your golf shot, assuming you did not manipulate it further off it path during your downswing. In such an instance, your down swing would deliver a closed club face to your ball at impact on an out-to-in swing path across your shoulder and target lines.

If you were to swing your club face even more extremely to the inside of your shoulder line during your back swing from such a set up position, you most likely would pull-hook your golf shot.

On the other hand, if you were to swing your club face to the outside of your shoulder line during your back swing from such a set up position, a non-manipulative down swing most likely would deliver a closed club face to your ball at impact on an in-to-out swing path across your shoulders and target line and produce a hook ball flight.

Were you to swing your club face even more to the outside of your shoulder line during your back swing in such an instance, a non-manipulative down swing would deliver an open club face to your ball at impact on an in-to-out swing path across your shoulders and target line and produce a push golf shot.

If you were to swing your club face even more extremely to the outside of your shoulder line during your back swing from such a set up position, you  most likely would produce a push-slice.

Now you should know that taking your club face to the inside of your shoulder (body) line to cure a slice is malarkey.

The best golf lesson to cure a slice is to take the club straight back on the shoulder/target line for at least a foot during your takeaway–which is precisely how it should track if you have established a square club face alignment at final address- and swing your club without trying to manipulate it either to the inside or to the outside of your shoulder/target line.

Why complicate matters?

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